Working with Resin

I have been having a lot of fun working with resin and wanted to share my latest batch of pendants. While there are tons of different resin products available, I am using EnviroTex Jewelry Resin.

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There are very specific instructions for every brand of resin and they should be followed precisely. For this brand of EnviroTex resin we will need equal parts of resin and hardener. They recommend using a pen to mark your measuring cup which is what I’ve done here.

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Before we begin, the resin and hardener needs to be warmed a bit in hot tap water for 5 minutes. Then you add the resin to the first mark and then adding the hardener to the second mark. Use one of the provided stir sticks and mix for a total of 2 minutes. After that time, transfer the resin to a second measuring cup and mix with a new stir stick for 1 minute longer, then you are ready to begin.

When I made the resin pendants for Christmas, I started by adding some resin to the bottom of the pendant and then adding the inclusions. This time around I began by gluing the glass glitter to the bottom of the bezels.

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With the bottle cap design I also added pearls, but rather than gluing them individually, I took a tip from online and strung them on a piece of string. This makes adding the beads so much easier than gluing them in one at a time.

When the glue was dry and it was time to begin, I added the resin with the help of the stir stick, adding a bit at a time so as not to have an overflow. After filling each bezel with resin, it is vital to remove any air bubbles to are produced. You can do this is a few different ways, but what I chose to do was to VERY carefully use a straw to blow across the surface of the resin. It is Vital that you DO NOT inhale through the straw, only gently exhale.

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Once the bubbles have been removed, you will need to cover your items to keep dust off of them until they are dry in about 24 hours. I usually let my pieces sit undisturbed for an additional 12 to 24 hours just to be sure they are completely cured.

Once I get these pieces finished, I’ll add some more photos of them for you, but until then, I hope you enjoyed this little tutorial.

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